Ask the Editor
Archive
Peter Sokolowski, Editor at Large
"You, too" and "Same here"
Thursday April 21st 2011
Question
"You, too" and "Same here"
Answer

Reader Payman asks for an explanation of the phrases "you, too" and "same here." Editor Kory Stamper explains.

You, too and same here have different meanings depending on the context, but they generally appear in informal or spoken English to answer a wish or confirm an experience.

You, too has two primary uses, and the meaning of the phrase depends quite a bit on punctuation. When followed by a period or exclamation point, you, too is used as an answer to someone's general good wishes. This sort of exchange generally happens at the end of an interaction or a conversation:

"It was good to catch up with you. Have a good day!"
"You, too."

"Take care!"
"You, too!"

"See you tomorrow!"
"You, too!" [=See you tomorrow, too!]

When you, too is followed by a question mark, however, it is used to ask the listener if they have had the same experience as the speaker:

"When I picked up the phone, the caller just hung up on me!"
"That happened to me last night!"
"Really? You, too?" [=That also happened to you?]

"My date never showed up. You, too?" [=Your date didn't show up either?]

Same here is another phrase that is very common in conversation, and is used to confirm that you have had the same experience as the speaker:

"My date never showed up."
"Yeah, same here."

"When I picked up the phone, the caller just hung up on me!"
"Same here!" [=The same thing happened to me.]

Very occasionally you see the phrase same here shortened to "Same!" or "Samesies!", but these uses are very informal and slang.

Both you, too and same here are informal in tone and should not be used in formal contexts.

Archive