pull

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1 pull /ˈpʊl/ verb
pulls; pulled; pulling
1 pull
/ˈpʊl/
verb
pulls; pulled; pulling
Learner's definition of PULL
: to hold onto and move (someone or something) in a particular direction and especially toward yourself
[+ object]
[no object]
[+ object] : to remove (something) by gripping it and using force
[+ object]
: to cause (something you are holding or something that is attached to you) to move with you as you go in a particular direction
: to cause (something) to move or be directed toward something
always followed by an adverb or preposition
[no object] of a car, train, etc. : to move from or to a particular place
: to move a vehicle from or to a particular place
[no object]
[+ object]
always followed by an adverb or preposition, [no object] of a car, wheel, etc. : to move to the left or right instead of straight ahead when traveling forward
always followed by an adverb or preposition : to move (your body or a part of your body) in a particular direction or to a particular position
[+ object]
[no object]
[+ object] : to move (a trigger, lever, etc.) in order to operate a device or machine
: to move a boat through water using oars : row
[no object]
[+ object]
[+ object]
: to remove (someone or something) from a place or situation
: to take (something) away
10 
[+ object] : to take (a weapon) out of a pocket or other hidden place
11 
[+ object] : to do (something)
12 
[+ object] : to hurt (a muscle, tendon, or ligament) by stretching it too much
13 
[+ object] sports : to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing
compare push
14 
[+ object] informal : to behave like (a particular person)
15 
British, informal : to attract (someone) sexually
[+ object]
[no object]
◊ In addition to the phrases shown below, pull occurs in many idioms that are shown at appropriate entries throughout the dictionary. For example, pull a face can be found at 1face, pull someone's leg can be found at 1leg, and pull the wool over someone's eyes can be found at wool.

pull a fast one

informal
: to deceive or trick someone

pull ahead

[phrasal verb]
: to take the lead in a race, competition, contest, etc.

pull apart

[phrasal verb]
: to be separated into parts or pieces by pulling
pull (something) apart or pull apart (something) : to separate or break (something) into parts or pieces sometimes used figuratively
pull (people or animals) apart or pull apart (people or animals) : to separate (people or animals) in order to stop a fight

pull aside

[phrasal verb]
pull (someone) aside
: to take (someone) to one side away from other people for a private conversation

pull at

[phrasal verb]
pull at (something)
: to hold onto and pull (something) repeatedly
: to breathe in the smoke from (a cigarette, pipe, etc.)

pull away

[phrasal verb]
: to begin to move farther ahead in a race, competition, contest, etc.
often + from

pull back

[phrasal verb]
: to decide not to do something that you had intended to do or started to do
pull back or pull back (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) back : to move back from a place or position or to cause (someone or something) to move back from a place or position
pull (something) back or pull back (something) British, sports : to score (a goal, point, etc.) so that you are not as far behind in a game as you were before

pull down

[phrasal verb]
pull down (something) or pull (something) down
: to move (something) down
: to destroy (a building) completely
: to make (something) smaller in amount or number : to reduce or lower (something)
pull down (someone) or pull (someone) down US, informal : to cause (someone) to become sad or depressed
pull down (something) informal
: to earn (a particular and usually large amount of money)
: to get (something)

pull for

[phrasal verb]
pull for (someone or something) US, informal
: to say or show that you hope (someone or something) will succeed, get well, etc.

pull in

[phrasal verb]
: to arrive at a place and come to a stop
pull in (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) in : to attract (someone or something)
pull in (something) also pull (something) in informal : to earn (a particular and usually large amount of money)
pull (someone) in : to bring (someone) to a police station : to arrest (someone)

pull off

[phrasal verb]
pull off (something) or pull (something) off
: to remove (something) from something else : to take off (something)
informal : to do (something difficult) successfully

pull on

[phrasal verb]
pull on (something) : to hold onto and pull (something) repeatedly
: to breathe in the smoke from (a cigarette, pipe, etc.)
pull on (something) or pull (something) on : to dress yourself in (clothing)

pull out

[phrasal verb]
: to decide not to do something that you had intended to do or started to do
pull out or pull out (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) out : to leave a place or position or to cause (someone or something) to leave a place or position
see also pullout

pull over

[phrasal verb]
pull over or pull over (something) or pull (something) over : to move a vehicle to the side of the road and stop
pull over (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) over : to force (a driver or vehicle) to move to the side of the road and stop

pull through

[phrasal verb]
: to survive a serious illness, injury, operation, etc.
pull through or pull through (something) : to get through a difficult situation
pull (someone or something) through : to help (someone or something) to continue to live or succeed in a dangerous or difficult situation

pull together

[phrasal verb]
: to work together as a group in order to get something done
pull together (someone or something) or pull (someone or something) together : to bring (people or things) together and organize them in order to make or do something
pull together (something) or pull (something) together : to make (something) by bringing together different things
pull (yourself) together : to become calm again : to control your emotions and behavior after you have been very upset, emotional, etc.

pull up

[phrasal verb]
pull up (something) or pull (something) up
: to move (something) up
: to move (something) forward or into a position where it can be seen, used, etc.
pull up or pull (something) up or pull up (something) : to stop a vehicle at a particular place
pull up : to stop suddenly before completing something
pull (someone) up British, informal : to criticize (someone) severely for doing something
2 pull /ˈpʊl/ noun
plural pulls
2 pull
/ˈpʊl/
noun
plural pulls
Learner's definition of PULL
[count] : the act of moving or trying to move something by holding it and bringing it toward you : the act of pulling something
[noncount] : special influence and power over other people
[count] : an ability or power to attract someone or to make someone want to go somewhere, do something, etc. usually singular
[singular] : a natural force that causes one thing (such as a planet) to be pulled toward another
[count] : an injury that is caused by stretching a muscle, tendon, or ligament too much
[count]
: the act of breathing in smoke from a cigarette, cigar, pipe, etc.
: the act of taking a long drink of something
[count] : something (such as a handle or cord) that opens or operates something when it is pulled
[count] chiefly British : a difficult climb up a steep hill usually singular
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